Seven Things Your Tattoo Artist Won’t Tell You

Seven Things Your Tattoo Artist Won’t Tell You

No matter what kind of job you have, there are secrets that you know about it that you don’t tell anyone. Whether it’s a secret stash of cookies in your filing cabinet or your how you bill each one of your clients, there are just some things that you just don’t talk to everyone about. With that being said, this happens in every profession, including being a tattoo artist.

You’re probably wondering what a tattoo artist can possibly not tell you considering how open their jobs are, but there are things in the industry that they don’t outright share with potential clients. To help avoid the lack of communication and possibly save you money, here are seven things tattoo artists don’t want to tell you.

 Seven Things Your Tattoo Artist Won’t Tell You

  1. Your tattoo artist wants to make money, not your decisions. You may wonder why a professional tattoo artist wouldn’t prevent you from making a decision you might regret later in life, but it’s their job. Although they are artists, they still have to pay their bills. Plus if you’re wondering why your tattoo artist let you get “SLUT” tattooed on your lower back, the simple answer is that you’re an adult. You made the decision. Artists have slots to fill; if they’re turning people away just because their tattoo is silly, that’s money out the door.
  2. Getting a tattoo in the summer is not a great idea. Summer is the time for shorts, crop tops, and zero sleeves. Unfortunately the only thing your tattoo hates more than being smothered while it’s healing is being in direct sunlight. Tattoo ink is made up of pigments that can fade easily when exposed to the sun’s ultraviolet rays. Obviously we don’t think you should wait 3 months to get a tattoo so once you get it, make sure to cover it with Saniderm and clothing that will cover it when you’re in direct sunlight.
  3. Not all shops will do finger tattoos. Although most tattoo artists have finger tattoos themselves, it’s rare for an actual shop to do them. The ink spreads and falls out unpredictable and aren’t worth it for artists. Wedding bands are especially tough and popular. It’s hard to go all the way around your finger and sooner or later it will look awful.
  4. Inside the lip is also a bad idea. It may be a popular place to tattoo, but they’re incredibly temporary because they are in the inside of your wet, bacteria-infested mouth. They spread into the skin and fall out quickly so don’t get surprised when your money disappears.
  5. Getting a name tattoo is a terrible idea unless it’s your mother or child. Tattooing your SO’s name on your arm is risky business. You are basically asking the universe to destroy your relationship. Stop testing the way the world works and hold off on the name tattoos. Blissful youthfulness, saving broken relationships, and even ownership of a partner makes this tattoo the number one cover up job that artists perform.
  6. What’s the deal with white tattoos? While there’s something alluring about white henna tattoos, they are an exception to another growing trend that leaves most with regret. These tattoos represent “no commitment” to tattoo artists. You’re going through the pain and healing for something that is sort of invisible. Some tattoo shops won’t even perform white tattoos because white ink falls out, can get splotchy, and might get yellow overtime.
  7. Don’t forget to tip! It’s in bad form to ask for a tip from someone, but while good ink costs tremendously more than a good drink, it’s still customary to tip for a job well done. Tattoo artists understand that people save money for bigger pieces, so any tip is appreciated. Save a little extra cash for your work of art and not only will you be showing your artist some appreciation; you’ll put yourself in a good position for getting a deal on a future tattoo. The amount you tip is really up to you as a customer. For every 100 dollars, tipping 20 -50 dollars is a pretty good rule of thumb. In the end it’s up to you.

 

 

By | 2017-09-06T12:26:33+00:00 March 17th, 2016|Articles|0 Comments

About the Author:

Translate »